Were Dinosaurs Real ?? Dinosaurs Time Period- 17 Unknown Facts you should Know

Were dinosaurs Real !!!


Were dinosaurs real New dinosaur species discovered in Japan

Were dinosaurs real Named Kamuys urus japonicus, the last species of dinosaur to be discovered populated the Japanese coastal areas at the end of the Cretaceous, 72 million years ago

Japanese researchers have identified a new species of the dinosaur by reconstructing an almost entire skeleton eight meters in length, the largest ever found in the Japanese archipelago.

Were dinosaurs real

After analyzing hundreds of 72 million-year-old bones, the team led by the University of Hokkaido (northern Japan) concluded that this skeleton belonged to a new species of the hadrosaurid family, called “dinosaurs”. Duckbill “, herbivores from the end of the Cretaceous geological period.

Part of the dinosaur’s tail was found in 2013, and later excavations had brought out the entire skeleton. The team gave it the name “Kamuys urus japonicus”, which means “Japanese dragon god,” according to a university statement.

Read also: A giant dinosaur over 200 million years old discovered

An independent evolutionary process”

The authors estimate that he was a nine-year-old adult, who would have weighed 4 or 5.3 tonnes depending on whether he was walking on two or four legs. The discovery was published in the British specialist journal Scientific Reports.

“The fact that a new dinosaur was found in Japan means that an independent world of dinosaurs existed in Japan or East Asia, with an independent evolutionary process,” said the team leader. Yoshitsugu Kobayashi, quoted in the university press release.

“It is rare that such a well-preserved dinosaur (skeleton) is found in East Asia,” Yoshitsugu Kobayashi told AFP on Friday. “With Japan having a lot of marine sediment, we expect more dinosaurs will be dug up in the future,” he added.

A coastal dinosaur

Kamuysaurus japonicus probably lived in coastal areas, a rare habitat for dinosaurs at that time. The bones also give information about their environment.

This discovery raises the hypothesis that certain dinosaur species “preferred to occupy regions close to the ocean and that the coastal environment played an important role in the diversification” of dinosaurs at the beginning of their Evolution, according to the University of Hokkaido.

A NEW SPECIES OF DINOSAUR DISCOVERED IN ECUADOR

In Ecuador, a team of researchers announced this Friday, December 6, having discovered a new species of dinosaur: the Camarasaurusoogenesis.

The name was chosen in reference to two localities: the Yamuna, in the south of the country, where the bones were found and Loja, where the results of this discovery were presented.

Herbivorous and small – six meters long and about two meters high -, the Camarasaurusoogenesis still had a neck of almost three meters. It has been classified in the group of tyrannosaurs, that of large species.

METEORITE FALL

The incomplete and disjointed skeleton shows that the species had “a protective breastplate,” Galo Guzman, head of the team at the Technical and Special University of Loja (UTPL), told AFP. It claimed the discovery of the “first fossil of a large vertebrate of the Cretaceous period in the country”, Friday, December 6, in the province of Loja where the bones were found in 2017.

According to researchers, the species appeared just before the meteorite fall that decimated all of the dinosaurs on our planet. The fossils unearthed to date, in fact, from the Cretaceous period and belong to the genus of the Saltasaurs, dinosaurs that lived 85 to 65 million years ago.

No new dinosaur species discovered in Thailand

A new species of carnivorous dinosaur has been found in Thailand. It fills a void in the fossil record.

iamraptorSuwati is the name of this new species of dinosaur found in Thailand, in the geological formation of the KhokKruat in the North East of the country and which is dated from the Lower Cretaceous (145 to 100.5 Ma). Only a few scattered bones remain, but they have made it possible to reconstruct a part of his skull and the general appearance of the animal.

A very imposing family

The Siam raptor belongs to the carcharodontosaurids which formed a widespread and prosperous group of enormous predatory dinosaurs. They lived at the end of the Jurassic and at the beginning of the Cretaceous period, and their fossils were found on all continents.

 Among the members of this group, there are some of the most giant dinosaurs that have ever populated the Earth like the huge giganotosaurus which could exceed 15 meters long for almost 14 tonnes!

Reconstruction of the skull of Siamraptorsuwati. 

Until now, no Carcharodontosaurus dating from the beginning of the Cretaceous had been found in Southeast Asia. The siamraptor is the first! It is a team from the University of Nakhon Ratchasima Rajabha, in Thailand, which is at the origin of his discovery.

 It is based on the identification of several fossilized bones including pieces of the skull, backbone, limbs and hips of at least four specimens. Phylogenetic analysis, the results of which are published in the journal PLOS ONE, indicates that the Siamraptor is a primitive member of the group of carcharodontosaurids, which reveals that these dinosaurs had already colonized this part of the world from the very beginning of the Cretaceous.

A new species of dinosaur identified 50 years after its discovery

Bones found 50 years ago in northern British Columbia have identified a new species of dinosaur, Ferris urus stoutness, that lived in the province 67 million years ago today.

In 1971, in northern British Columbia, a geologist accidentally found the remains of a claw in a rock that was a stone’s throw from a railway and the Sustut River, north of Smithers.

Researcher Victoria Arbor of the Royal British Columbia Museum in Victoria participated in the research, which confirmed that this claw and other bones found at the site later belonged to a species never identified to date.

It’s a funny little dinosaur, she says.

New species in British Columbia: a first

In an article published in the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences, his team specifies that this is the first time that a new species has been discovered in the Western province.

The vast plains and exposed rocky areas of the Prairies are the sources of many more finds, says Victoria Arbor. In British Columbia, the often-uneven terrain makes exploration more difficult.

A question about dinosaurs comes up often. It is that of their number. You should know that about 700 species have been named. However, a recent scientific study suggests that only half of these are based on complete specimens of which one can be sure that they belong to single and separate species.

 These species are classified into 300 genera of validated dinosaurs (Stegosaurus, Diplodocus, etc.), although nearly 540 have been named. Recent studies show that between 700 and 900 kinds of dinosaurs remain to be discovered.

Many species to discover

Most genera of dinosaurs have only one species to date (like the Dionysus). But some have more (the Iguanodon for example). Even if all 700 published species are valid, their number is still less than a tenth of the number of currently known living bird species, less than a fifth of the number of known mammal species, and less than one-third of the number of spider species presently known.

Dinosaurs: how many species have existed?

Dinosauria

Were dinosaurs real

Before reading the rest of this column, offer an answer to this question about the number of dinosaur species that existed during the Mesozoic (Secondary Era). Please note, in all that follows, the studies only take into account non-avian dinosaurs, ie by excluding “the first birds” which started to prosper during the second half of the Mesozoic.

In any case, this is indeed a difficult question to answer about dinosaurs. Contrary to popular belief, the fossil record only gives a very partial picture of the reality of past diversity. It’s like a massive puzzle of which we would only have a few pieces scattered here and there and of which we must imagine the countless missing pieces. 

We only know part of the real diversity of a fossil group, and we can only propose estimates based on hypotheses to quantify the actual difference.

Species and genera

If the delimitation of living species is hard work and subject to controversy, that of fossil species is an even more delicate art since we usually only have bone remains, fragmentary or in poor condition.

 We regularly come to consider such a fossil as a new species before discovering that it is, for example, a juvenile form or that in such a species, males and females are so different that we took them for different species. Conversely, we often have to “miss different species” for lack of discriminating elements.

 Would we be able to distinguish a house sparrow from a tree sparrow, two clearly identifiable current species, if we had them in the form of fossils: not sure at all! So, we must keep in mind this inevitable bias to put into perspective the figures obtained in the counting of fossil species.

Palaeontologists also rely on another very classic concept in systematics: the genus, the taxonomic unit which groups together closely related species. This notion is, in fact, the most well-known to the general public (without knowing it of their own free will!):

 We thus speak of the iguanodon (genus Iguanodon), where specialists distinguish at least two species or even allosaurus (genus Allosaurus) which covers at least three different species according to palaeontologists (A. fragile; A. europaeus; A. Lucas). To assess the diversity at a given time, we therefore often use the number of genera present since it apparently allows us to eliminate the difficulties of delimitation between species.

 Except that the notion of genius is almost arbitrary: from when do we decide that two species are no longer “close enough” to place them in two different genera? Thus, regularly, the limits of the genres undergo profound changes, objects of fierce debate!

First estimates

Armed with this preliminary warning, let us see the figures circulating until 2016. In 1990, P. Dodson published a view which has long served as a reference based on the duration of existence of the genres then known: between 900 and 1200 genera of Dinosaurs would have existed during the Mesozoic with approximately 100 families for each of the geological stages of this vast period; if we consider that each family can contain several species, we arrived at several thousand species.

In 2006, a new estimate was based this time on the rate of discovery which is accelerating: since 1990, on average, nearly 15 new genera have been described each year against 1 per year between 1824 and 1969.

Palaeontology has experienced incredible growth in recent decades, especially for dinosaurs which benefit from a popular craze and therefore more generous research grants.

 At this date, 527 genera were recognized. The study, therefore, proposed a total estimate of 1844 genres of which we only know 30% of them! However, in the final discussion, it was noted that the known fossil record of dinosaurs is biased by the availability and accessibility of the sedimentary rocks containing the fossils.

It is by integrating this bias that a new estimate had just been published in 2016. Two researchers in Sweden have developed a statistical model which gives an average of 1936 species (between 1543 and 2468) for 1536 genera (1255-1929) for the whole of the Mesozoic. Let’s see the principles of this new model and its lessons.

A multitude of biases

The fossilization process, which requires rapid burial in sediment is already in itself exceptional: most animals that die in the wild end up completely decomposed without leaving any trace. When it comes to terrestrial animals like dinosaurs, the probability of fossilization becomes even rarer.

 Then, once “created”, the fossil must be found to be taken into account; however, it can be destroyed by erosion or end up in a rocky outcrop inaccessible to humans for multiple reasons. 

To this must be added, the intensity of research very variable according to the countries, the subsidies allocated, the university orientations (there is not only the Mesozoic and the dinosaurs to explore!) which means that often there is a correlation between research intensity and observed diversity. In short, there are multiple biases likely to alter knowledge of the fossil record.

To all of this, we must add a significant transverse bias that we call the “common cause” hypothesis. The diversity of fossil fauna and field sampling are both dependent on the same common factor: changes in sea level over time that have controlled the surface of the land.

 During specific Jurassic periods, for example, we know that the land area has been reduced due to a very high average sea level: therefore, sedimentary rocks likely to contain dinosaurs (terrestrial, remember!) Are rare and the biodiversity of terrestrial fauna had to be reduced during these periods due to lack of land! However, a recent study (4) tends to show that this supposed correlation would be ineffective in the case of Dinosaurs and that it is the variation in the sampling, which remains the major explanatory cause.

Trips

The model put in place in the 2016 study seeks to assess real wealth (number of species) and does not just measure relative wealth over time as we did before. This explains the letters TR in the acronym Trips for True Richness. 

To get around these sampling biases mentioned above, this model is based on a simple principle: if a fossil species is observed many times over a given geological period, it is because it had a higher probability of fossilization; then, from these potential fossilization rates, we can estimate the number of species which were less likely to be fossilized and therefore subsequently to be discovered.

 This model makes it possible to compare geological periods of unequal duration. The study authors recognize that, despite this, their model still has some biases that they have taken into account when discussing the results.

Another vision of diversity

In addition to the overall estimate mentioned above, this model provides some lessons on the details of variations in the variety of dinosaurs and challenges certain misconceptions.

There are very few species per genus: on average 1.15 species/genus identified but this may correspond more to the methods of delimiting genera (see the first paragraph). The model indicates a much stronger diversity than we thought at the end of the Triassic: there was, therefore, a strong diversification from the beginning of the appearance of dinosaurs and this extended over more than 40Ma.

 The Oxfordian floor (-163.5 to -157.3Ma) was thought to be the least rich in dinosaurs; in fact, it would be sampling and “common cause” artefact. Likewise, a classic crisis at the border between the Jurassic and the Cretaceous was conventionally indicated: the model suggests that there has been a decline in diversity but much less than previously thought.

 Finally, regarding the very end of the Cretaceous (terminal stage of the Maastrichtian), the model proposes a drop of 13 to 17% in the rate of appearance of species (speciation) in two of the three broad groups of dinosaurs. 

This tends to confirm that the diversity of the Dinosaurs had started to decrease well before the significant impact of the meteorite, which was only a knockout.

 This point will be the subject of a future column. Finally, note that this model can guide future excavations by indicating the subsampled stages.

Dinosaurs: what did T. rex really look like?

While a skeleton of the most famous dinosaur is exhibited in Paris at the Museum of Natural History, return to this animal sometimes overlooked by the general public.

Rarely have we talked so much about T. rex. On the occasion of the release of the film “Jurassic World: the Fallen Kingdom” on Wednesday, June 6 in France, this mythical animal is honoured in Paris.

 The skeleton of a female is thus exhibited at the National Museum of Natural History at the Jardin des Plants in Paris from June 6, while that of a theropod dating back 150 million years is put up for auction in the Gustave Eiffel lounge.

 On the first floor of the Eiffel Tower, Monday, June 4. To allow the general public to know more about T. rex, France 5 devotes a documentary dedicated to him Tuesday, June 5. Here are some secrets about this legendary animal.

An extraordinary creature

Were dinosaurs real

The Tyrannosaurus rex, king of tyrant lizards in Latin, has always divided researchers since the first discoveries of its remains in North America in the 19th century. If only 25 skeletons of this species of dinosaur have been found in the world, they easily allow drawing the frame of the animal.

 And there is no doubt that the T. rex, with its 13 meters in length and 4 meters at hip height for the most imposing whole skeleton ever found, does not resemble any living species. Or rather many of them. Because by studying more precisely its fragments, scientists have almost succeeded in giving it body.

A formidable jaw

By comparison with animals still in existence today, some specialists say that the Tyrannosaurus would be closer to the alligator, the two species having similar maxillary muscles which can exert phenomenal pressure on their prey, up to four tonnes for T. rex, according to different simulations. 

A resemblance between the two animals reinforced by their flaking skin, but which does not reach the undeniable similarities observed between the crocodile and the Razana, species whose fossils were discovered in 2006.

A Funny Bird

Several elements observed thanks to the remains of T. rex show a real resemblance between the giant of the Cretaceous and our contemporary birds. In addition to a tiny brain that is reminiscent of that of flying creatures, the profile of their teeth suggests that tyrannosaurs tore food as raptors do for food. However, several recent studies tend to prove that the king of the lizards did not wear feathers, in opposition to the theories born from the discovery of down in fossils of species close to T. rex.

A social animal

The largest predator of its time has long been considered a lonely animal, devoid of social life. However, the discoveries of several deposits and footprints in North America demonstrate their gregarious instinct. 

These dinosaurs, therefore, lived in groups. Convenient for hunting since, contrary to popular belief, their speed was limited to 25 km / h at most. They could thus count on the youngest to bring their prey down to the most influential adults.

An agile killing machine

Sometimes represented as a somewhat unbalanced scavenger, the T. rex was more like a discreet hunter. The colour of his skin thus drew on dark colours like brown, black or grey. He left few traces behind him, notably none of his tail, which did not drag on the ground but remained well in height to counterbalance the weight of his enormous head.

This is what the Tyrannosaurus Rex really looked like

If Spielberg’s version was one of the most faithful representations of the T-Rex to date, new works offer a different and fascinating version of the most formidable of theropods.

In the light of the latest research, a team of palaeontologists accompanied by the Californian illustrator RJ Palmer, specialized in the creation of creatures for films and video games, announced to have reconstructed as faithfully as possible the appearance of the T -Rex. As evidenced by the latest scientific studies and the analysis of fossils relied on by specialists, the T-Rex was in reality, far from the slender predator that we imagined.

A LITTLE FLAT PORTRAIT

First observations, the formidable predator of the Late Cretaceous appeared to be rather heavy due to a shallow centre of gravity.

This vision would join recent statements by scientists claiming that the T-Rex had trouble moving. He also sports two tiny forearms that look atrophied but extremely sharp. Conversely, its hind legs are dull and testify to its bipedal mode of movement.

According to RJ Palmer and the scientists who worked on the project, the T-Rex was rather massive…

According to RJ Palmer and the scientists who worked on the project, the T-Rex was rather massive and would have had very neutral colour.

If the issue of feathers remains a subject of debate in the scientific community, it is more than likely that the T-Rex did not have one, as the Biology Letters claim. His skin was rather smooth and scaly. On her nape were plates of keratin.

 Scientists have deduced this based on the development of modern birds, descendants of ancient theropods. They also bordered the animal’s jaw with extra-oral tissue, similar to a bulging skin, which was probably used to hide its sharp fangs.

The colour of the T-Rex was reasonably neutral, similar to that of modern Komodo dragons. According to scientists and RJ Palmer, the bright colours that palaeontologists often give to their dinosaurs were rather sported by tiny animals. This neutral colouring is better suited for a giant predator such as the T-Rex.

 “THE MOST EXHAUSTIVE ATTEMPT TO RESTORE AN ANIMAL”

It was after long months of research combining palaeontology, physiognomy and cutting-edge software that scientists managed to draw this robot-portrait of the Tyrannosaurus Rex. The teams worked layer by layer on this robot portrait, starting from the skeleton to the scales, passing through the muscles.

 A titanic and incredibly realistic work according to Scott Hartman, paleobiology and consultant on this project. “The team worked from the skeletons, spent months imagining the appropriate muscles, and the results are now visible to everyone.

 The time spent and the attention to detail dazzled me. This is the most comprehensive attempt to represent an animal I have worked on. “

Were dinosaurs real

To realize the meticulous work carried out, the specialists decided to create a gigantic version of the animal, which will be exhibited at the Museum of Natural History and Science in Mexico City during the Paleoart exhibition.

What did the cry of the dinosaurs really look like?

According to a new study by American researchers, the cry of the dinosaurs was not at all like what you see in the movies. It looked like a cooing rather than a fierce roar.

When we think of the cry of a dinosaur, the image that comes to mind is that of a voracious beast, tilting its head back before emitting a roar that makes the mountains tremble. If this representation is so common, it is because it appears in profusion in all cinematographic works, including the famous Jurassic Park.

This does not mean that it is representative of reality, on the contrary. The few scientific data highlighted to date indeed suggest a trend utterly different from that of the collective imagination. Forget the cries of many decibels and blood-chilling tones.

According to a new study by researchers at Midwestern University in Arizona, the vocalizations of dinosaurs are somewhat similar to a coo emitted in closed war. Enough to squeeze the thrilling atmosphere of American blockbusters slightly.

A response track in birds

To reach such a conclusion, scientists have studied the closest present representatives of dinosaurs, namely birds. Their research has involved examining the vocal organs of more than 200 different species and placing these observations in an evolutionary context in order to trace the history of the dinosaur cry.

“If we look at the vocalization” closed mouth “of birds living today, we can imagine how the dinosaurs made sounds,” said Chad Eliason, co-author of the study published recently in the journal Evolution.

He develops: “Our results show that the so-called ‘closed mouth’ vocalization has known about 16 evolutions among Archosauria’s, a group which includes birds, dinosaurs and crocodiles. What is interesting is that only animals of relatively large size use the wording ‘closed mouth'”

A peculiarity of large specimens

For comparison, this sound would sound like the cooing of a large pigeon or that of an ostrich as you can hear in the video above. According to the researchers, these vocalizations are characteristic of large-scale species, the size of which at least exceeds that of a dove. You need a safe to make this kind of call.

The proportion of lungs must, therefore, be sufficient to allow the birds to enlarge the diameter of their throat and produce these noises by using air pushed into their oesophagus. Because dinosaurs are part of the Archosauria’s and most of them had large bodies, it is likely, according to the researchers, that some were already emitting vocalizations “closed mouth”.

However, at this stage, palaeontologists have no fossils revealing or giving concrete evidence on how dinosaurs vocalized. As for the usefulness of any cooing, there is a multitude of interpretations for dinosaurs as for birds ranging from seduction to defines of the territory.

Using the laser, researchers have revisited the fossils of a small flying dinosaur, Anchoring, carefully studying the bones of its legs and wings, but also the soft tissue. Conclusion: This animal looked much more like birds than we thought. The proposed reconstruction would be the best at the moment for a dinosaur.


´╗┐Were dinosaurs Real

Were Dinosaurs Real He lived in the Jurassic, 160 million years ago, ran on two legs and his body about thirty centimetres high was covered with black and white feathers, while his head sported a red tassel. Discovered in 2009 in China, Anchiornis – “almost a bird” – has become in the eyes of palaeontologists a link between older avian dinosaurs and our current birds.

 Was he flying? What cousin did he have with other theropods (like the famous T. Rex) and with future birds? Despite the 200 specimens found, these questions have not yet been answered.

On nine of these fossils, Michael Pittman, of the University of Hong Kong, and his team used a laser-induced fluorescence technique which allows a detailed analysis of structures, coming from bones but also, primarily, from soft tissues. 

These researchers based their study on a systematic comparison with current birds. Results: the resemblances are more numerous and more important than we thought.

The wings of Anchiornis were those of a bird

The laser analysis clearly shows, for example, the presence of a small “patagium”. This cutaneous veil forms the leading edge of the wing of current birds, between the body proper and the first joint. In other words, between the shoulder and the forearm.

. Pterosaurs, extinct flying reptiles, and current bats also have such patagia. Another similarity at the level of the leg is that of the tibia with the “pestle” of the chicken.

Could Anchiornis fly or at least hover? Michael Pittman’s study does not confirm this. But it does show that the history of birds and their ability to fly begins at least 160 million years before the present. It also demonstrates, in passing, the interest of this new laser-induced fluorescence technique for studying the tiny remnants of soft tissue that remain in ancient fossils.

A new species of dinosaur discovered in Japan

The 8-meter skeleton belongs to a new species in the hadrosaurid family, known as “duck-billed dinosaurs”, a herbivore.

A new species of dinosaur has been identified by Japanese researchers. This discovery was possible thanks to the reconstruction of an almost entire skeleton with a length of eight meters, the largest ever found in the Japanese archipelago.

After analyzing hundreds of 72 million-year-old bones, the team led by the University of Hokkaido (northern Japan) concluded that this skeleton belonged to a new species of the Hadrosauridae family, called “dinosaurs”. duckbill”, a herbivore from the end of the Cretaceous geological period.

Part of its tail was found in 2013; then subsequent excavations had brought out the entire skeleton. The team chose the name “Kamuysaurus japonicus”, which means “Japanese dragon god”, according to a university statement.

The authors estimate that it was a nine-year-old adult, who would have weighed 4 or 5.3 tonnes depending on whether he walked on two or four legs. The discovery was published in the British specialist journal “Scientific Reports”.

He evidently lived in coastal areas

“The fact that a new dinosaur was found in Japan means that an independent world of dinosaurs existed in Japan or East Asia, with an independent evolutionary process,” said the team leader. Yoshitsugu Kobayashi, quoted in the university press release.

Kamuysaurus japonicus probably lived in coastal areas, a rare habitat for dinosaurs at that time. The bones also give information about their environment.

 The discovery raises the hypothesis that certain species of dinosaurs “preferred to occupy regions close to the ocean and that the coastal environment played an important role in the diversification” of the dinosaurs at the beginning of their Evolution, according to the University of Hokkaido.

Kamuysaurus japonicus”, a new species of dinosaur discovered in Japan

The discovery of this eight-meter-long hadrosaurid raises the hypothesis that certain species of dinosaurs “preferred to occupy regions close to the ocean”.

Eight meters in length, it is the most massive dinosaur skeleton ever found in the Japanese archipelago. 

After analyzing hundreds of 72 million-year-old bones and reconstructing an almost entire skeleton, Japanese researchers from Hokkaido University (northern Japan) concluded that this dinosaur belonged to a new species in the family of hadrosaurids, known as “duckbill dinosaurs”, a herbivore from the end of the Cretaceous geological period.

The authors of the skeleton discovery, reported Thursday, September 5 in the journal Scientific Reports, estimate that it was an adult aged nine years, who would have weighed 4 or 5.3 t depending on whether he walked on two or four legs. The team chose the name Kamuysaurus japonicus, which means “Japanese dragon god”. A part of its tail was found in 2013, and then subsequent excavations had brought out the entire skeleton.

An “independent world of dinosaurs” in East Asia

Kamuysaurus japonicus probably lived in coastal areas, a rare habitat for dinosaurs at that time. The discovery notably raises the hypothesis that certain species of dinosaurs “preferred to occupy regions close to the ocean and that the coastal environment played an important role in the diversification” of the dinosaurs at the beginning of their Evolution.

“The fact that a new dinosaur was found in Japan means that an independent world of dinosaurs existed in Japan or East Asia, with an independent evolutionary process,” said the team leader. of researchers, Yoshitsugu Kobayashi.

 “It is rare for such a well-preserved dinosaur to be found in East Asia, ” he said while saying he expected more skeletons to be unearthed in Japan in the future. Countries “with a lot of marine sediments”.

Australia: discovery of a new dinosaur

According to the information relayed by “Sciences and future”, the Galleonosaurusdorisae was a living herbivore 125 million years ago.

A new species of dinosaur has just been identified. The animal was named Galleonosaurusdorisae, reports Sciences et Avenir, and lived around 125 million years ago in Australia.

 The identification of this new herbivore species was made possible by the study of five upper jaws fossilized in rocks, therefore, dating from the Cretaceous and found in the south-east of the country.

According to an article in the Journal of Paleontology, which Science and Future relays, the Galleonosaurusdorisae was a wallaby-sized herbivore, belonged to the ornithopod family and moved on two legs. Scientists say the animal has many things in common with other ornithopods in Patagonia, Argentina.

Read also A giant 200-million-year-old dinosaur discovered in Argentina.

This could be explained in particular by the fact that 125 million years ago, Australian and Argentinian lands, as well as part of the African continent, Indian and Antarctica, located in the current world in the southern hemisphere, formed a single continent called Gondwana.

 At the time, it was possible at certain times of the year to link Australia, Antarctica and South America.

It has been ten years since the scientific community began studying fossils linked to the Galleonosaurusdorisae. But it was only with the last bones discovered during excavations on Australian soil by volunteers of the “Dinosaur Dreaming” project that the identification of the animal could be carried out.

A NEW SPECIES OF DINOSAUR DISCOVERED IN ECUADOR

In Ecuador, a team of researchers announced this Friday, December 6, having discovered a new species of dinosaur: the Yamanasauruslojaensis.

The name was chosen in reference to two localities: Yamana, in the south of the country, where the bones were found and Loja, where the results of this discovery were presented.

Herbivorous and small – six meters long and about two meters high -, the Yamanasauruslojaensis still had a neck of almost three meters. It has been classified in the group of titanosaurs, that of large species.

METEORITE FALL

The incomplete and disjointed skeleton shows that the species had “a protective breastplate,” Galo Guaman, head of the team at the Technical and Special University of Loja (UTPL), told AFP. It claimed the discovery of the “first fossil of a large vertebrate of the Cretaceous period in the country”, Friday, December 6, in the province of Loja where the bones were found in 2017.

According to researchers, the species appeared just before the meteorite fall that decimated all of the dinosaurs on our planet. The fossils unearthed date, in fact, from the Cretaceous period and belong to the genus of the Saltasaurs, dinosaurs that lived 85 to 65 million years ago.

FIRST A considerable bird, 3 meters long, 210 million years old. This is the robot portrait of a new species of dinosaur, hitherto unknown, discovered in Frick, in the canton of Aargau, in 2017.

The dinosaur skeleton discovered in 2017 at Frick (AG) did indeed belong to a representative of a species still unknown until then. Almost 3 meters long, it is a predator, ancestor of birds, which lived in the Triassic, 210 million years ago.

During archaeological excavations in 2017, researchers had uncovered the first skeleton of a predatory dinosaur found in Switzerland. After studying it, Marion Zahner and Winand Brinkmann, researchers at the University of Zurich, described it in the journal “Nature Ecology & Evolution”.

According to them, this dinosaur was not yet adult at the time of his death. The state of conservation of his skull is particularly useful, write the two researchers.

Unique discovery in the world

Until then, only fragments of dinosaur skulls dating from the same late Triassic geological period had been discovered. The invention that occurred in Frick’s clay quarry, therefore, makes it possible to complete the incomplete knowledge of the Evolution of predatory dinosaurs of this period.

The species discovered in a clay quarry in the Aargau commune is now called notatesseraeraptorfrickensis. It is close to the first predatory dinosaurs and is an early representative of the line that gave birth, much later, to birds. “In the broadest sense, it is an ancestor of birds,” explains Marion Zahner to Keystone-ATS.

Close to the dilophosaurus

The notatesseraeraptor (“characteristic mosaic” in literal translation) is apparently a close relative of the dilophosaurus made famous by the film series Jurassic Park. At the same time, its skull and its skeleton present aspects similar to the coelophysis, dinosaur hunter with the long neck, familiar of the dilophosaurus but leaner.

The researchers were also able to analyze one of the last meals of the dinosaur: there is a piece of the jaw of a clevosaurus, a familiar species of sphenodons, an animal with the appearance of a giant lizard.

What did the dinosaurs really look like?

Yes, well, we may still not want to hug them!

Representations, information errors, dinosaurs are sometimes wrong: sharp teeth and nasty looks, we see the dinosaurs represented only in this way. But what about their hair, their lips or even their eyes?

The artist C.M. Kosemen has decided to represent them in the most realistic way possible; we let you watch to see what you think.

1. The Albertosaurus

2. The pterosaur

3. The deinonychus

4. The diplodocus

5. An elephant, a horse and a rhino

6. The majungasaurus

7. The pterodactyl

8. The pterosaur

When he came out of his egg, the baby tyrannosaurus looked like a big bird with teeth. His arms were surprisingly large. An exhibit shows what the juvenile T. Rex looked like.

All the terrifying tyrannosaurs were once babies. But what did these formidable predators still fresh look like? Since March 11, 2019, the American Museum of Natural History has devoted an exhibition to this emblematic dinosaur. We discover that the young T. Rex looked like a chicken … with teeth.

“You will never think of the T. Rex in the same way again,” said the museum on the page of its website devoted to the exhibition. A video published in February reveals a baby tyrannosaurus. It changes our perception of this theropod dinosaur that lived until the mass extinction that occurred 66 million years ago.

ITS ARMS GROWED LESS THAN THE REST OF THE BODY

Tyrannosaurus babies hatched from their shells. They were then covered with a down, which made them look like big strange birds. Their teeth did not yet look like an adult’s. They probably ate insects or small reptiles.

The arms of the dinosaur, small compared to its adult size, appear proportionately more imposing in a young specimen. “The body grows faster than the arms. It is therefore not the arms that decrease in size. They don’t grow as fast as the rest of the body,” says palaeontologist Mark Norell.

BABY BONES ARE FRAGILE

Studying dinosaurs at the stage of babies or young adults is complicated for scientists: their bones are particularly fragile. As Mark Norell notes, the discovery of fossils of young dinosaurs has mainly been made in the past 20 years.

The recent discovery of an adult specimen, which lived 96 million years ago, has also shed more light on tyrannosaurs: this ancestor helps to understand how these animals became powerful predators.

This is what the ancestors of the dinosaurs looked like

The ancestors of the dinosaurs looked like crocodiles, reveals a study of fossils recently discovered in southern Tanzania, published in the scientific journal Nature.

For decades, scientists imagined these ancestors as miniature dinosaurs the size of a chicken and moving on two legs: the discovery of the Teleocraterrhadinus, a carnivore resembling a crocodile 2 to 3 meters long with a long neck, a tail and four legs, changed everything.

The first fossil was discovered in 1933 and studied in the 1950s at the Natural History Museum in London, but the skeleton was incomplete. New specimens found in 2015, also in southern Tanzania, have identified Teleocrater as a “missing link between dinosaurs and the common ancestor they share with crocodiles,” says Ken Angielczyk of the Field Museum. In Chicago.

Surprised, the ancestors of the dinosaurs do not resemble them at all,” notes Ken Angielczyk. “Teleocrater looks like a crocodile, and that forces us to completely rethink what we thought of evolution (of the dinosaurs) in its infancy,” he said.

dinosaurs game no internet
dinosaurs video for kids
how many dinosaurs were there
dinosaurs of the jurassic period
dinosaurs game no internet
when dinosaurs roamed america
dinosaurs time period
dinosaurs were reptiles
dinosaurs offline game


Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *